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Seattle Seafood Seasoning

Seattle Seafood Seasoning - Seattle, Washington is in the heart of the Pacific Northwest Cuisine area, which has some international culinary influences from the Chinese, Korean and Japanese, but mainly from the amazing fresh local seafood and Native American tribes. This seafood seasoning blends the international flavor essences of Seattle and is great on salmon but particularly good on milder fish like halibut, Pacific black cod and trout.

Sale price $3.79 Regular price $12.69

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Seattle Seafood Seasoning - Seattle, Washington is in the heart of the Pacific Northwest Cuisine area, which has some international culinary influences from the Chinese, Korean and Japanese, but mainly from the amazing fresh local seafood and Native American tribes. If you ever visit Seattle, you must see the famous Pike Place Market for a culinary adventure to enlighten all your senses!  This seafood seasoning blends the international flavor essences of Seattle and is great on salmon but particularly good on mild fish like halibut, Pacific Black cod and trout.

Spice Ingredients: Applewood smoked Pacific sea salt, sesame seeds, garlic, black tea, ginger, onion, celery, cilantro, star anise, orange and lemon peel and chives.

Please click on the RECIPE tab here for detailed cooking instructions.

Seattle Seafood Seasoning is available in a 4 oz. spice grinder bottle and a 16 oz. refill bottle, so you can refill your spice grinder bottle which can be reused multiple times.

Seattle Seafood Seasoning Cooking Instructions 

This seasoning blend is designed around the flavor of the various cuisines of Seattle, Washington, incorporating Asian and Northwest American Indian cuisines.  This spice blend is intended to be used with mild seafood like halibut, Pacific black cod, trout, steelhead salmon.

 NOTE: To review and/or select the meat you wish to use, please refer to the "Recommendation Guide to selecting your beef, pork, chicken, turkey or seafood" PDF, located in the Recipe link in the heading at the top of the Home page. 

Method:

1)  Spray your fish on both sides with a light coating of vegetable oil.

2)  Grind the seasoning on all sides of the fish.  Let it marinate for at least 20 minutes of up to 24 hours under refrigeration.As always, the more seasoning you put on your meat the more flavor you will get on the crust when the meat is finished.  The amount of seasoning shown in Figures 1 & 2, below, will get you a good medium flavor profile.

NOTE: One word of caution, these rubs are self-contained, meaning that they already have salt in them in the proper ratio to the spices and herbs, so don’t overdo it with grinding the rubs or add any additional salt. 

 NOTE:  Always buy your meats from a quality reputable stores.  Keep all meat under refrigeration as much as possible during preparation.  Don’t leave any meats out at room temperature for more than 30 minutes, except when you are ready to cook it.  Then let it just reach room temperature prior to cooking, but don’t let time exceed an hour.  Food safe guidelines recommend that any proteins (meats in this case) are not exposed to the “Temperature Danger Zone” (40 F. to 140 F) for more than 4 hours for its entire journey to you cooking it.  We are informing you of these food safety guidelines, because we want you to have a wonderful flavorful safe food experience, every time.

Halibut with Seattle Seafood Seasoning

Figure 1.  Fresh Halibut with Seattle Seafood Seasoning.

Ahi Tuna with Seattle Seafood Seasoning

Figure 2.  Ahi Tuna with Seattle Seafood Seasoning.

3)  Heat a sauté pan to medium high or preheat an oven to 375°F.

4)  Add a little oil to the sauté pan and add the seasoned fish.  The oil should be hot but not smoking.

5)  Sear for 3 to 4 minutes depending on the thickness of the fish.  Using a spatula, turn the fish over and continue to sauté for another 3 to 5 minutes for just cooked through fish.  Please do your family and friends a favor and don’t overcook the fish!  It will become dry if you cook it much past 145°F.  For tuna you might want to serve it rare to medium well, depending on your quests tastes. We recommend using a digital instant read thermometer for acurracy!

 Sauteed fresh halibut with Seattle Seafood Seasoning

Figure 3.  Oven roasted fresh halibut with Seattle Seafood Seasoning.

Seared Ahi Tuna with Seattle Seafood Seasoning

Figure 4.  Seared Ahi Tuna with Seattle Seafood Seasoning.


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